Step Right Up

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An old slip and a sweet rendition of the letter “S”

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How “S” was shipped, not so subtly and with stamps!

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Sweetly synched slip with seeds

Slip with silver, sumac, sedge and sycamore.  The S box arrived, but I didn’t open it right away.  I know that there are only a couple of more letters headed this direction. Before I opened it, I savored its arrival, imagined the contents, then broke open the pod that was the packaging and explored the interior.   Was it really a slip?  What is sedge? Which is the sumac?What about that orange thread?  Maybe it once matched some of the seeds?  What IS the provenance of that slip?  It reminds me, I’ve wanted to recreate an old dress with seeds in the hem.  As if someone were transporting them clandestinely,  to save them for flourishing elsewhere.  Seeds are about potential.  So satisfying. Who isn’t optimistic about a collection of seeds.

Red and Violet

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“R” (w)Rapped Rigidly and Redundantly with Red thread at Right Angles

ImageSo, inside the rectilinear red tin, rigidly (w)rapped, resides a multitude of Red objects heretofore reservedly resting in my studio.  My studio is a rather robust repository of recycled relics.  I’d be really happy to recount from whence they were rounded up and then share these raw materials with you.  To me they are not only red, but also rich and relevant …and probably redundant.  Read on…

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One framed cabbage.

My first inclination was to make a video.  A violent video of viciously assaulted vegetables.  But I couldn’t bring myself to do it.  The cabbage was just so beautiful inside that I decided I had to try and capture that somehow.  So, I printed with it instead.  Here is a violet vegetable presented in a vintage frame.  Eh, voila!  My final letter.  My 13th.  Thank you Brassica Oleracea Capitata, I am happy that you could contribute. You are one very vibrant and beautiful vegetable.

The Home Stretch

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Yellowroot, full bottle with label

Local specimen found in my local studio.

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Further information for the herbarium.

Xanthorrhiza Simplicissma, my entry for the letter X.

Also know as Yellowroot and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if Paige doesn’t have some of it growing in her neck of the woods.  Common and easy to propogate we know that it flourishes on both sides of the pond (your local pond and the one the Queen of England sometimes crosses.)  I wondered how I was going to pull off an entry with a real link to the letter X.  John Bartram wouldn’t have been the least bit surprised. (Although his specimen would have been a bit fresher, but not so long lasting.)

X just went out a couple of days ago.  It was accompanied by R and Q.  R, Q & S coming next!